‘Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now’, NGA, Canberra: Part one closes 9th of May 2021

April 29, 2021

Only a few days left to see Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now Part one, and Transfer Station 1 (2011) by Buxton Contemporary Collection artist Mira Gojak at the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra. The work was previously exhibited at Buxton Contemporary as a part of The Garden of Forking Paths: Mira Gojak and Takehito Koganezawa curated by Melissa Keys.

Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now showcases art made by women and features works by Buxton Contemporary Collection artists Pat Brassington, Janet Burchill, Destiny Deacon  & Virginia Fraser, Julie Dowling, Mikala Dwyer, Emily Floyd, Rosalie Gascoigne, Simryn Gill, Helen Johnson, Angelica Mesiti, Tracey Moffatt, Rose Nolan, Raquel Ormella, Patricia Piccinini and Justene Williams.

Plan your visit and find out more about the exhibition and accompanying publication via NGA website.

Know My Name Part Oneis on view in its entirety until 9 May after which it will be gradually transformed into Part Two. Know My Name Part Two opens in full on 12 June 2021.

Image: Installation view, The Garden of Forking Paths: Mira Gojak and Takehito Koganezawa, Buxton Contemporary, the University of Melbourne, 2018–19, with Mira Gojak, Transfer station 1, 2011, (foreground), and Mira Gojak, Propositions for escape, 2005, (background), both works courtesy of the artist and Murray White Room, Melbourne; photography Christian Capurro.

RECENT NEWS

‘Tar­raWar­ra Bien­ni­al 2021: Slow Mov­ing Waters’, Tar­raWar­ra Muse­um of Art,  open till 11 July 2021

‘Tar­raWar­ra Bien­ni­al 2021: Slow Mov­ing Waters’, Tar­raWar­ra Muse­um of Art, open till 11 July 2021

Buxton Contemporary Collection artists Daniel Crooks and Raquel Ormella have each been com­mis­sioned to cre­ate new work for the Tar­raWar­ra Bien­ni­al 2021: Slow Mov­ing Waters. Curat­ed by Nina Miall, the exhi­bi­tion responds to two relat­ed cues: the idea of...

MeMO: Grant Stevens, ‘Fawn in the Forest’

MeMO: Grant Stevens, ‘Fawn in the Forest’

Reviewing Grant Stevens’ Fawn In The Forest Phillip Brophy writes: I’m writing this while Fawn In The Forest “plays” on my second screen. Or is it “happening”? Maybe it’s “running”. It just keeps going, as if its status as image is somehow in motion, fluid,...

Pin It on Pinterest